• ¿DUDAS? ¿PREGUNTAS? 616490937
  • 616490937
  • ENVÍO GRATIS PEDIDOS > 90 €
  • ENTREGA 24/48 h.
  • ¿DUDAS? ¿PREGUNTAS? 616490937
  • 616490937
  • ENVÍO GRATIS PEDIDOS > 90 €
  • ENTREGA 24/48 h.

FOUR EASY WALTZES

Núm. producto: astute 514-09

12,00 €

Disponible

Descripción

Autor: Raffaele Calace

Para: Mandolina sola (opción de acompañamiento de guitarra fácil)

Edición: Alison Stephens

Nivel: Intermedio

Información:

Four Easy Waltzes for Solo Mandolin
By Raffaele Calace (1863-1934)
With optional easy guitar accompaniments by Alison Stephens

Amadeo, Op.1
Soirée d’été, Op.2
L’appassionata, Op.3
Oreste, Op.4

These four pieces are beautiful little miniatures. They appear to have originally been written as solo pieces. They work very well as solo pieces but to give more flexibility and scope a simple, mainly chordal, guitar accompaniment has been included for each piece. The mandolin parts are in a separate pull-out but also have the chord symbols enabling a teacher or other player to accompany with simple chords on another mandolin or other instrument instead of the supplied guitar part. Although these pieces are relatively simple they still have all the romantic charm and harmonic interest that is typical of Calace’s later music.
Performance notes:
I have kept editorial additions to a relative minimum. There are various fingerings to achieve a smoother tone or for ease for execution in some places. There is little in the way of phrase marks (as in the original) but I have added a few dynamics. The markings are for guidance only and the player should add their own ideas.
Calace is, of course, famous for his use of tremolo. These pieces are ideal for players with little or no tremolo skills as I believe they sound utterly charming without any tremolo at all. I have deliberately omitted to make tremolo suggestions for this reason. For players who are fairly comfortable with tremolo I would suggest using tremolo mainly on minims or dotted minims to start with. Ultimately, when tremolo is a more established technique there are many places where a “legato tremolo” could be employed to great effect but it is not essential.
Alison Stephens